Rocket Hobbyists Show Off Unique Designs in Bonneville

Although the multi-million dollar rockets roaring off the launchpad often have similar shapes and designs, you’re bound to find some unique rocket designs at the Utah Rocket Club (UROC) Hellfire 18 event at the Bonneville Salt Flats. Unbound by needs of payload capacity and insertion points, model rocket designs probe the limits of design, often adding their own signature style.

Some rockets are designed simply to have a unique look. One was modeled after a chess piece. Another resembled a supersonic plane, built entirely from aluminum. One hobbyist showed off his glistening blue carbon fiber lined body tube, christened the Mockingjay after the iconic symbol of The Hunger Games. When pressed about the use of carbon fiber, he simply replied that he thought it looked the best.

However, not everyone cares about style; one hobbyist found practical reasons to modify his design. At a prior launch, one of his rockets plunged through the front window of a car due to a parachute deployment failure. Determined to make his rockets’ landings safer, this enterprising designer made two rockets of foam and balsa wood. Using a FUNNOODLE ® foam pool noodle as the body tube and nose cone and fins made of sturdy balsa, these rockets don’t need a successful parachute deployment anymore. When they smack the concrete-hard surface of the Bonneville Salt Flats, they simply bounce, ready for another launch as soon as the motor is replaced.

The diversity of designs is astonishing compared to large-scale rocket designs, even if the success rate isn’t as high. One can only hope that the commercial launch vehicles created by the likes of SpaceX, Blue Origin and Orbital Sciences will someday have as much diversity as one crate of rockets sitting in the blistering Utah sun. Who wouldn’t want to launch into orbit on a rocket shaped like a chess piece?

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